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Importance of upper cervical flexion

Exit forum ID Forum Discussion Importance of upper cervical flexion

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by   Christopher Stepien November 18, 2019 at 8:13 am.

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  • #8474

    Brandon Cohen DC, CSCS
    Participant

      How are you using the research discussed in last weekend’s seminar about the importance of upper cervical flexion and its predicting power for degeneration with older populations who already have significant degeneration?

      How has this changed your communication?

      #8475

      Keith Puri, DC
      Participant

        For those who were not able to attend, could you please share the research you are referring to?
        Thanks.

        #8478

        Carl Nottoli, DC
        Participant

          https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00586-019-06157-0

          “OCI, an important factor to maintain horizontal gaze, was demonstrated to be associated with radiological adjacent segment degeneration (ASD), suggesting that the occipito-cervical angle influences accelerated cervical degeneration. Since occipito-cervical angle (OCI) did not change after surgery, degeneration of the cervical spine may be predicted by the value of OCI.”

          These findings are associated with the changes we measure and improve with UCF tests and treatments. More confirmation that ID is ahead of the curve.

          #8480

          Keith Puri, DC
          Participant

            Thanks, Carl!

            #8487

            Christopher Stepien
            Participant

              Love the question Brandon.

              Seems to be just more proof in the pudding. Restricted ranges –> Restricted function –> Accelerated degeneration. Same as blood pressure for the heart.

              I don’t think there’s a better way to explain this than Bill’s explanation: “Everyone can agree that touching your toes or bringing your bicep to your head is important. Can you imagine what happens when those aren’t full and symptom-free?”

              This keeps it simple in the patient’s mind so they understand.

              I’m always curious to communicate things better, so I’m open to hearing what others have to say that seems to communicate any of these points more effectively.

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